Saturday, August 6, 2011

John Deere 2640 overpainting; in-progress oil on panel by Paul Baldassini

Please contact me via email:
paul@baldassinifineart.com

“I don’t trust men who smile too much.”  — Kor, Klingon commander



Place a reserve deposit on this in-progress painting
and receive a plein air field study FREE!  
contact paul@baldassinifineart.com for details

This is my overpainting in-progress.  Five hours work, so far.  The predominantly green background was a challenge as not only did I have to mix a variety of different greens, this tractor like all John Deere tractors is  also predominantly green.

My starter piles were mixed from 1. Chinese Orange (Sennelier) and Indigo (Willamsburg) and 2. Perylene Crimson (Willamsburg) and Indigo .  I mixed up a bunch of each of those transparent mixtures along with a large glob of medium (Old Masters Maroger, Flemish formula) and oiled up the background.  This allowed me to further develop my value plan already on the background with my Quin magenta underpainting.  I proceeded to glaze an orangey-greenish color on the left moving across the panel to violety-blues on the right — warm to cool.  After that set up, I got right to work direct painting with more opaque mixtures using ever-growing little piles of warm and cool greens.  These are made up from my master piles modified with all three  yellows on my palette: Cadmium Yellow Lemon and Medium (Sennelier) and a new color I’m introducing into my palette, Cadmium Yellow Deep (Holbein).  The Cad Yellow Deep and Viridian (Willamsburg) mixtures make stunning warm greens and the Indigo/Chinese Orange mixed with Warm Gray (Sennelier) or Raw Sienna (Willamsburg) make lovely cool blue-greens.  In fact Warm Gray is mixed into just about every color I mix to neutralize it as necessary.  Most everything in nature is really a dulled down hue anyway.  When I come back later with more full chroma hues here and there, they really sparkle.

I tried (very hard) not to noodle around after the fact and made every brush stroke matter.  The (almost) unconsciously considered strokes have great presence and I’d rather leave a mistake in there than mess everything up with overworked fix-ups, which are, unfortunately sometimes necessary.  Once I get in the zone I can move along without really thinking about what I am doing and many hours later when I stop and step back and really take a good look, I am  usually quite pleased.


Thanks for visiting.

P

Thursday, August 4, 2011

John Deere 2640 underpainting; in-progress oil on panel by Paul Baldassini

Please contact me via email:
paul@baldassinifineart.com

“If we did all the things we are capable of, we would astound ourselves.” — Thomas Edison



Place a reserve deposit on this in-progress painting
and receive a plein air field study FREE!  
contact paul@baldassinifineart.com for details

I've been very busy during these summer months with commercial work.  The bulk of the work was a large estate archive from a New Hampshire family who commissioned me to restore 160 of their family photographs.  This in addition to my regular theater arts graphic design advertising and marketing projects allowed me very little time to develop new work.  But I did manage to pick away at a new painting during the down time between client approvals and have finally finished the underpainting.

With the composition laid out, I completed the underpainting, again using Quinacridone Magenta (Sennelier) straight out of the tube. As usual, I’m painting on a primed panel — 1/2-inch MDF sealed and primed with two coats of latex exterior white housepaint and two coats of Gamblin Oil Painting Ground, a mixture of alkyd resin, titanium dioxide and barium sulfate — no lead. Trim size of this panel is 30 1/2 x 24 inches.

I’ve tried many different  underpainting colors including Burnt Sienna (nice), Transparent Red Oxide, Burnt Umber, Raw Umber, Raw Sienna (nice for plein air), and Asphaltum (the worst).  For my modified glaze & scumble technique, I’m convinced that Quinacridone Magenta is the perfect underpainting color.  Its transparent, not overly dark, dries fast and greens painted over the rich pinkish underpainting just glow.  In fact every color painted over this underpainting color has this magical and elusive quality that I’ve never been able to replicate any other way.

If you paint landscapes either plein air or in the studio and rely on a monochrome underpainting to block in your composition, give Quinacridone Magenta a try and let me know what you think.

Thanks for visiting.

P