Wednesday, May 7, 2014

“White and Yellow Roses” — in-progress painting by Paul Baldassini

“Begin at the beginning and go on until you come to the end: then stop” — Lewis Carroll

To secure this Baldassini original artwork  for your collection please call 860-638-0890 today.  Or visit my website baldassinifineart.com to view other works in this series and other series.




Here is the in-progress overpainting of a new work "White and Yellow Roses" using my standard full-palette of colors. The first rose is (pretty much) completed using the direct-painting technique. After this layer dries I will glaze & scumble over some areas to make them advance, recede or otherwise slightly manipulate some of the tones and hues.


My full-color palette has benefited greatly from the addition of Sennelier Cool Grey.  I can now mix an even more useful range of neutrals which, as I learned from years of painting only in watercolor.  These neutral mixtures are essential and a key to providing realism, depth and believability of light and light effects with the more saturated color mixtures used in the halftones and the even higher chroma mixtures in the lights and highlights.


This structured approach to painting perfectly suits my idiosyncratic personality type.  For me, its a very nice way to craft a painting.



Paul Baldassini

“White and Yellow Roses” — in-progress painting by Paul Baldassini

“And the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.” — T.S. Eliot

To secure this Baldassini original artwork  for your collection please call 860-638-0890 today.  Or visit my website baldassinifineart.com to view other works in this series and other series.





Here is the third in-progress stage and the completed underpainting of a new work entitiled "White and Yellow Roses."  I really like the Raw Umber (Old Holland) underpainting instead of my usual Quinacridone Magenta.  It should provide a perfect underpainting for the direct full-palette painting, which will be whites and soft yellows with their accompanying shadows.  The contrasting darkest values will be the deep greens surrounding the flowers which should really them stand out.

I can't overstate the importance of a well executed underpainting. Not only does it solidify the overall concept and design, but it serves as a "road map" of values on which all of the color mixtures can be keyed to.  In addition, the shadows especially benefit from a glaze using more medium (I use Old Masters Maroger Flemish Medium) and less paint so that the underpaimting shows through somewhat adding richness and depth.  This provides luminosity and contrast to the more heavily painting halftones and even heavier painted lights and highlights.

Paul Baldassini